Sunday, November 30, 2008

Steven B. Tamarin, MD

I’ve just received the terrible news of the sudden passing of Steven B. Tamarin, MD.
I had known Steve for several years through our joint service on the Board of Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health, and considered him a wonderful person and a friend.
I am just attaching the text of an email sent out by a much closer friend of his, Neal Calman, MD, who so articulately honors him.

We will miss you very much, Steve.

Dear Friends:

I am deeply saddened to relay to you news of the death of Steven B Tamarin MD, a personal friend, a great physician and one of the founders of Family Medicine in New York City. Steve died unexpectedly in his sleep last night while visiting his cousin in Massachusetts. His loss is a tragedy for all who knew him and loved him.

Steve was an outspoken advocate for women’s rights, an ardent supporter of the Tipitapa project in Nicaragua where he visited and worked many times over the years – as well as being one of the smartest and most dedicated physicians I have ever met. He read medical journals like they were novels that he couldn’t put down – enthralled at every new study that provided insight into the workings of the human body in health and disease. One could not spend even a single dinner with Steve without him being called on his cell phone by his patients – many of whom he had cared for over decades.

Steve was a long-time member of the Institute’s Board of Directors and as the only physician on our Board, was depended upon to challenge our clinical protocols when needed and provide advice on issues of medical controversy. He was also a past president of the New York State Academy of Family Physicians – a position he held with distinction and one of which he was most proud. He continued to be involved in the Academy on a local level, bringing politically important issues to the forefront at all times.

Steve was one of the first of the new generation of Family Physicians in Manhattan. Along with the late John Falencki, they forged the path that many of us followed. We are forever indebted to them for their foresight and courage.

Steve will be sorely missed by his family, his patients, his friends and his colleagues.

There is no information at present as to funeral arrangements but information will be forthcoming when it becomes available.

Personally, I am heartbroken to lose him.

Neil Calman MD

As am I. Steve, we will continue the struggle!






Josh

2 comments:

Laurie Wiegler said...

Josh, I was Dr Tamarin's patient for 5 years. The way I've been feeling, you'd think I'd lost a dear friend - oh guess what, that's exactly how it feels.

I would like to dedicate a song and a street to Dr Tamarin. MORE THAN THAT I want to see real changes in this country's healthcare system. I wrote an article about how to find affordable healthcare, but that's only a bandaid approach.

I truly believe, as I struggle to make sense of Dr Tamarin's death, that the over-arching purpose was to draw greater attention to the causes he believed in. I would be proud to help you and the doctors with whom he worked by writing letters, op ed pieces, etc. (I am a journalist.)

Anyway, all for now. It's been a week today since I found out the horrible news. Even this morning I cried - again. I drew some comfort reading about how Paul Newman appeared to Joanne Woodward in a dream. We've all lost people we love; a few years ago I lost another Steve, my boyfriend. I believe they're our angels now, guiding us to make better choices, to be more giving, and more in line with our very best selves.


Laurie Wiegler

see:

http://lauriewiegler.blogspot.com/

euncyk said...

I knew Steve during a time of his own personal sruggle; but he still had the time,interest and intergrity to care about others. He was a truly sincere and dedicated helping profesional.

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